ADA National Network Webinar Series: Emergency Management and Preparedness-Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities

Schedule 2017-18

These 90 minute webinars are delivered by the Pacific ADA Center using the Blackboard Collaborate webinar platform. All sessions will be captioned, recorded and archived.

This program is delivered via both webinar platform and via telephone (additional charges may apply). Real-time captioning is available via the webinar platform.

Webinars begin at ET: 2.30pm, CT: 1.30pm, MT:12.30pm, PT:11.30am, Hawaii: 9.30am during mainland Standard Time; 8.30am during mainland Daylight Savings Time

ADA National Network Learning Session: Feeling Safe, Being Safe Going Forward

14th February, 2019

Registration for this webinar is not yet open.

Feeling Safe, Being Safe was the first online emergency preparedness training series developed by people with intellectual disabilities for people with disabilities and older adults.

The success of Feeling Safe, Being Safe has encouraged adaptation of this model for training development and delivery on a variety of related disability inclusive emergency management initiatives throughout disaster response, recovery and mitigation.

This webinar will examine the strategies used to develop and pilot the community based online community training module, train-the-trainer series and easy-to-use materials. Webinar facilitators will speak about the value of end-user engagement in emergency management training tools.

Feeling Safe, Being Safe was originally developed by The Board Resource Center and California Department of Developmental Services with funding from FEMA/DHS in 2009.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn the value of end-user input throughout design and training.
  • Understand ways to adapt Feeling Safe, Being Safe tools and training for unique regional needs.
  • Learn basic methodologies to replicate Feeling Safe, Being Safe tools and training.

Presenters:

Marcie Roth is the CEO of The Partnership for Inclusive Disaster Strategies. Previously, Marcie served as Senior Advisor to FEMA Administrator Fugate and was the Director of the FEMA Office of Disability Integration and Coordination (ODIC) after her appointment by President Obama in June 2009. While at FEMA, Marcie led the national transformation towards integrating the access and functional needs of children and adults with disabilities in all aspects of whole community emergency and disaster preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation.

Mark Starford is the Director of The Board Resource Center (BRC). Since 1994 BRC has been providing leadership training and developing accessible tools for organizations and government agencies that advocate for, and provide services to, underserved communities. BRC's focus is on developing adapted sustainable multi-media materials to increase community inclusion, personal safety, and civic engagement for persons with disabilities and older persons. Recent priorities include disability inclusive emergency preparedness, abuse prevention and end-of-life advance planning.

ADA National Network Learning Session: Fitting Accessibility into the Design and Construction Standards of Storm Shelters.

11th April, 2019

The ICC 500 is a standard for the design and construction of storm shelters for protection from tornados and hurricanes. This course will review where storm shelters are required by the International building codes. There will also be an overview of the technical, or the how to, requirements in the ICC 500, including access for persons with disabilities. The needs of the type of shelter differ because of the differences between tornadoes and hurricanes. Some of the biggest differences is the amount of warning time to get to a shelter, the time the occupants will stay in the shelter and the differences in the forces from the wind and debris on the shelter. This class will explain those differences and the why behind the requirements.

Learning objectives:

  • Identify where storm shelters are required in the codes.
  • Determine the extent to which storm shelter standard (ICC 500) provisions apply for required and non-required storm shelters
  • Have a general understanding of scoping (where) and technical (how) requirements for tornado and hurricane storm shelters

Presenter:

Kimberly Paarlberg is a Senior Staff Architect in Technical Services with the International Code Council (ICC). Her experience with ICC includes work in the plan review and code development departments with responsibilities for code development, providing code interpretations, instructing technical seminars and authoring and reviewing instruction materials, code commentary and publication articles. Kimberly serves as code development secretary for the IBC Means of Egress/Accessibility and IBC and IRC Structural committees. She is ICC representative for development of the referenced technical standard, ICC/ANSI A117.1 "Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities." She is also secretariat for the ICC 500 - Design and Construction of Storm Shelters.

Before joining ICC, Kimberly worked as a structural engineer and architect. Kim is a licensed architect in Illinois and holds an Accessibility Inspector/Plans Examiner certification. She is also a member of her county Civil Emergency Response Team (CERT), and has completed several FEMA classes.